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Boeing successfully fly second production-ready T-X jet trainer

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World Defense & Security Industry News - Boeing & Saab
 
 
Boeing, Saab successfully fly second production-ready T-X jet trainer
 
Boeing and partner Saab have completed the first flight of their second production-ready T-X aircraft, which is identical to the first and designed specifically for the U.S. Air Force advanced pilot training requirement, the US-based aircraft manufacturer said on April 24, 2017.
     
Boeing Saab successfully fly second production ready T X jet trainer 640 001Boeing/Saab's second T-X jet trainer made its maiden flight
(Credit: Boeing)
     
During the one-hour flight, lead T-X Test Pilot Steve Schmidt and Boeing Test Pilot for Air Force Programs Matt Giese validated key aspects of the aircraft and further demonstrated the low-risk and performance of the design, proving its repeatability in manufacturing.

The jet handled exactly like the first aircraft and the simulator, meeting all expectations,” said Giese. “The front and back cockpits work together seamlessly and the handling is superior. It’s the perfect aircraft for training future generations of combat pilots.

Both pilots trained for the flight using the complete Boeing T-X system, which includes ground-based training and simulation.

Our successful flight test program is a testament to the fact that our offering is the right choice for the U.S. Air Force,” said Schmidt. “This aircraft was built to Air Force requirements and designed to fulfill the Air Education and Training Command mission.

The Boeing T-X aircraft has one engine, twin tails, stadium seating and an advanced cockpit with embedded training. The aircraft is powered by one General Electric F404 afterburning turbofan engine.

Boeing and Saab revealed their design in September 2016 and flew the first aircraft last December.

About 350 aircraft are expected to be ordered by the US Air Force to replace the T-38, but further purchases could push the overall purchase to over 1,000.