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F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet Multirole fighter aircraft
 
 
 

F-18 FA-18 F/A-18 F/A-18E F/A-18F Super Hornet Boeing multirole fighter aircraft technical data sheet specifications intelligence description information identification pictures photos images video United States American US USAF Air Force defence industry military technology

Description

The combat-proven F/A-18E/F Super Hornet delivers cutting-edge next generation multi-role strike fighter capability that is available today, outdistancing current and emerging threats well into the future. The Super Hornet has the capability, flexibility and performance necessary to modernize the air or naval aviation forces of any country. Built by the industry team of Boeing, Northrop Grumman, GE Aircraft Engines, Raytheon and more than 1,900 suppliers nationwide, the Super Hornet provides the warfighter with today’s newest advances in multimission capability and growth for decades to come in missions, roles and technology. The Super Hornet’s suite of integrated and networked systems provides enhanced interoperability and support for ground forces as well as the overall force commander. The Super Hornet entered combat on its maiden voyage in 2002 and remains combat deployed today.
There is Two Super Hornet versions – the single-seat E model and the two-seat F model – are in production today and in service with the U.S. Navy. The Royal Australian Air Force operates the two-seat F model Super Hornets.
Both are true multi-role aircraft, able to perform virtually every mission in the tactical spectrum, including air superiority, day/night strike with precision-guided weapons, fighter escort, close air support, suppression of enemy air defenses, maritime strike, reconnaissance, forward air control and tanker missions.
The F/A-18E/F has exceptional combat maneuverability, unlimited angle of attack, high resistance to spins and departures, and ease of handling and training. Its reconfigurable digital flight control system can detect damage to or full loss of a flight control and still allow safe recovery. These and other enhancements ensure the Super Hornet remains combat relevant through the coming decades.
The first production model Super Hornet was delivered to the U.S. Navy in December 1998, more than one month ahead of schedule. To date, the program has delivered every Super Hornet on or ahead of schedule. After completing the most thorough operational evaluation in U.S. Navy history, the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet entered operational service in November 1999, and the program was awarded an unprecedented five-year multi-year contract for 211 aircraft. The first operational F/A-18E/F Super Hornet squadron – VFA-115 – stood up in June 2001 and deployed aboard the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) in July 2002. In April 2005, Boeing delivered the first Block II Super Hornet, complete with AESA radar. The program delivered the 400th Super Hornet to the U.S. Navy in June 2009.

 
Variants
- F/A-18E Super Hornet: single seat variant.
- F/A-18F Super Hornet: two-seat variant.
- EA-18G Growler: electronic warfare aircraft, a specialized version of the two-seat F/A-18F Super Hornet.
     
Technical Data
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Design
The F/A-18E/F was designed around a balanced approach to survivability, incorporating low observability with internal integrated countermeasures, and high crew situational awareness to provide first-day-of-the-war capability. The next-generation aerodynamic design of the Super Hornet Block II enhances combat effectiveness, safety and training by offering unlimited angle of attack maneuvering, extreme maneuverability and exceptional combat agility.
The Super Hornet is largely a new aircraft. It is about 20 percent larger, 3,200 kg heavier at empty weight, and 6,800 kg heavier at maximum weight than the original Hornet. The Super Hornet carries 33 percent more internal fuel, increasing mission range by 41 percent and endurance by 50 percent over the "Legacy" Hornet. The empty weight of the Super Hornet is about 5,000 kg less than that of the F-14 Tomcat which it replaced, while approaching, but not matching, the F-14's payload and range.
Avionic

A comprehensive spiral development design concept – including the addition of the APG-79 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar – offers continuously improving overall mission capability and supportability. Integrating the APG-79 AESA radar, Advanced Targeting Forward Looking Infrared (ATFLIR) system, Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS), Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS), advanced high capacity computer system, and state-of-the-art cockpit provides the warfighter with intuitive situational awareness.
The Super Hornet's original avionics and software have a 90% commonality with then current F/A-18C/Ds. The Super Hornet features a new touch-sensitive, up-front control display; a larger, liquid crystal multipurpose color display; and a new engine fuel display.The Super Hornet has a quadruplex digital fly-by-wire system,as well as a digital flight-control system that detects and corrects for battle damage.Initial production models used the APG-73 radar, later replaced by the APG-79 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA).The AN/ASQ-228 ATFLIR (Advanced Targeting Forward Looking InfraRed), is the main electro-optical sensor and laser designator pod for the Super Hornet. The communications equipment consist of an AN/AR-210 VHF/UHF radio and a MIDS low volume terminal for HAVE QUICK, SINCGARS and Link 16 connectivity.
The defensive countermeasures of block I aircraft includes the AN/ALR-67(V)3 radar warning receiver, the AN/ALE-47 countermeasures dispenser, the AN/ALE-50 towed decoy and the AN/ALQ-165 Airborne Self-Protect Jammer (ASPJ). Newer block II aircraft replace the ALQ-165 with the AN/ALQ-214 Integrated Defensive Countermeasures (IDECM) system which consists of internally mounted threat receivers and optional self-protection jammers. The interior and exterior lighting on the block II has also been changed to allow the air crew to use night vision goggles (NVG). The older ALE-50 decoys are being replaced by ALE-55 towed decoys, which can transmit jamming signals based on data received from the IDECM.

Propulsion
Two General Electric F414-GE-400 engines power the Super Hornet, producing a combined 44,000 pounds of thrust. Increased airflow to the engine is provided through the Super Hornet’s large, distinctively shaped inlets. A full authority digital electronics control (FADEC) allows for unrestricted engine response in any phase of flight.
Armament
With a total of 11 weapons stations, the Super Hornet gives warfighters extraordinary payload flexibility by carrying a mixed load of air-to-air and air-to-ground ordnance. A typical basic loadout for a self-escort strike mission starts with an advanced infrared targeting pod, one AIM-120 AMRAAM, two AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles, a 20mm cannon and an external fuel tank. This leaves six under-wing weapon stations available to carry a variety of weapons and other stores.
The FA-18 Super Hornet is armed with 1× 20 mm (0.787 in) M61 Vulcan nose mounted gatling gun, 578 rounds. Eleven hardpoints are available on the F-18 with 2× wingtips, 6× under-wing, and 3× under-fuselage with a capacity of 8,050 kg external fuel and ordnance.
Air-to air Missiles: 4× AIM-9 Sidewinder or 4× AIM-120 AMRAAM, and 2× AIM-7 Sparrow or additional 2× AIM-120 AMRAAM.
Air-to-surface missiles: AGM-65 Maverick, Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM-ER), AGM-88 HARM Anti-radiation missile or AGM-154 Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW).
 
Specifications
Type
Multirole fighrter aircraft
Country user
United States, Australia
Country producer
United States
Crew
1 or 2
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Engine
Two General Electric F414-GE-400 engines
Speed
Maximum speed: 1,900 km/h
Range
2,346 km maximum
Weight
14,552 kg empty
Avionic
Hughes APG-73 or Raytheon APG-79 Radar, Northrop Grumman/ITT AN/ALE-165 self-protection jammer pod or BAE Systems AN/ALE-214 integrated defensive electronic countermeasures system, Raytheon AN/ALE-50 or BAE Systems AN/ALE-55 towed decoy, Northrop Grumman AN/ALR-67(V)3 radar warning receiver, MIDS LVT or MIDS JTRS datalink transceiver
Dimension (F-35A)
Length: 18.31 m; Wingspan: 13.62 m; Height: 4.88 m
 
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F-18 FA-18 F/A-18 F/A-18E F/A-18F Super Hornet Boeing multirole fighter aircraft technical data sheet specifications intelligence description information identification pictures photos images video United States American US USAF Air Force defence industry military technology
 
F-18 FA-18 F/A-18 F/A-18E F/A-18F Super Hornet Boeing multirole fighter aircraft technical data sheet specifications intelligence description information identification pictures photos images video United States American US USAF Air Force defence industry military technology
F-18 FA-18 F/A-18 F/A-18E F/A-18F Super Hornet Boeing multirole fighter aircraft technical data sheet specifications intelligence description information identification pictures photos images video United States American US USAF Air Force defence industry military technology
F-18 FA-18 F/A-18 F/A-18E F/A-18F Super Hornet Boeing multirole fighter aircraft technical data sheet specifications intelligence description information identification pictures photos images video United States American US USAF Air Force defence industry military technology
F-18 FA-18 F/A-18 F/A-18E F/A-18F Super Hornet Boeing multirole fighter aircraft technical data sheet specifications intelligence description information identification pictures photos images video United States American US USAF Air Force defence industry military technology
 
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