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India will produce its own Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft for the Navy


By 2026, the Indian company Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) should develop a twin-engine jet carrier-based fighter to supplement or even replace the Russian MiG-29K in the Indian Navy.

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India will produce its own Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft for the Navy 925 001 India made a concept map of the hidden fighter, and France's Dassault and General Electric are striving for technical cooperation. (Picture source: Indian Media)


The Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA), the next-generation Indian fighter, is expected to make its maiden flight in 2032

The AMCA is being designed and developed by the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA).

In the next two to three months, the design for AMCA will be completed. ADA plans to develop five AMCA prototypes and will be seeking government approval towards the end of this year.

The HAL Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA) is an Indian programme to develop a fifth-generation fighter aircraft.


India will produce its own Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft for the Navy 925 002 India made a concept map of the hidden fighter, and France's Dassault and General Electric are striving for technical cooperation. (Picture source: Indian Media)


About the AMCA fighter jet:

According to ADA, AMCA will be a single-seat true multi-role twin-engine fifth-generation stealth aircraft which will weigh around 25 tonnes. It will incorporate some advanced technologies such as Advanced Sensors with Data Fusion, 360-degree enhanced situational awareness, Integrated Vehicle Stealth Management, Internal Bay Weapon, Active Electronically Scanned Arrays (AESA) radar and super-manoeuvrability.

The designed shape of AMCA is different from normal aircraft to achieve a high degree of stealth. When normal aircraft enters in enemy boundary, the early warning radar system sends radar beam signals to locate the aircraft and when the beam reflects the skin of the aircraft, the radar receiver will send the information to the on-board computer system and the surface-to-air-missile system will be used to shoot the aircraft.