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The Russian Yak-130 trainer light attack aircraft for the first time at the Farnborough AirShow 0407124

 
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Online Show Daily News
Farnborough 2012 AirShow
Aerospace Aviation Exhibition
Farnborough, United Kingdom

9 - 15 July 2012
 
 
The Yak-130 at Farnborough 2012 Air Show
 
 
The Russian Yak-130 trainer light attack aircraft for the first time at the Farnborough AirShow.
 
Russia’s Yakovlev Yak-130 Mitten trainer/light attack aircraft will be showcased for the first time at the Farnborough International Air Show as part of a large Russian exhibit. Russian companies, including 19 defense industry firms, will take part in the airshow near London on July 9-15 to exhibit the latest achievements in the Russian aircraft industry.
     
Russia’s Yakovlev Yak-130 Mitten trainer/light attack aircraft will be showcased for the first time at the Farnborough International Air Show as part of a large Russian exhibit. Russian companies, including 19 defense industry firms, will take part in the airshow near London on July 9-15 to exhibit the latest achievements in the Russian aircraft industry.
Russia Yak-130 Trainer/Light attack aircraft
     
The Yakovlev Yak-130 is a russian made subsonic two-seat new-generation aircraft intended for basic and advanced flight training of air school trainee pilots to fly fourth- and fifth-generation combat aircraft, for maintaining flying skills of pilot personnel of regular air units, and flying combat missions in local armed conflicts.

The Yak-130 features design simplicity, high reliability of its airframe, powerplant and aircraft systems, a long lifetime, independent basing capability, as well as high maintainability ensured by its automated onboard diagnostics and monitoring system.

In 2005, the plane won a Russian government tender for training aircraft and in 2009, the first planes entered service with the Russian Air Force, which placed firm orders for 55 aircraft.

The first export orders were signed in 2006, when Algeria ordered 16 Yak-130s and Libya put an order in for 6 planes.

Deliveries to Libya were expected in 2011–2012, but after the downfall of the Gaddafi regime, the Libyan National Transitional Council canceled Libya's order for Yak-130s in September 2011 as part of a review of all existing arms contracts.

Syria agreed to buy 36 Yak-130s for $550 mln in 2011. The overall foreign market capacity for the Yak-130 is estimated at 250 aircraft.